Thursday, 23 November 2017

Diabetes Clinic

Most people with Type 1 diabetes attend a hospital diabetes clinic. People with Type 2 diabetes will mostly attend their GP, but some may need to attend the hospital diabetes clinic or both.

While attending your clinic appointment, you will be able to discuss any problems you may have with your medication and we can also provide specialist advice on diet, exercise and other lifestyle issues associated with your diabetes. You will usually be seen by a Diabetes Specialist Nurse (DSN) and in some cases you may also be seen by a Diabetologist who visits every 4 months from Glasgow. We have an excellent care link set up with Greater Glasgow & Clyde which can offer advice and support at any time via the DSNs. Young people with Diabetes have direct access to this support out with normal working hours.

If you visit one of our clinics, blood samples maybe taken and tested for:

Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). This is done at every visit and tells how well controlled your diabetes has been over the previous 3 months. Good control means an HbA1c of 48 - 58mmol/mol. This is equivalent to an average blood glucose of between 6 and 10 before meals. The blood sample is taken using a finger prick test. It is processed while you wait and takes about 6 minutes. This allows the Diabetes Specialist Nurse to decide if any changes to your treatment are required. All the Diebetes Specialist Nurses are able to prescribe and make any necessary changes to your medication, you do not need to see your GP as well.

Renal Function. This is checked yearly and tells us how well your kidneys are working.

Cholesterol. This tells how much 'good fat' and 'bad fat' is in your blood. It is checked yearly or more often if it is high.

You will also be asked to bring along a urine sample that has been collected first thing in the morning. This is tested for:

• Protein (called microalbumin). High levels of microalbumin are associated with a greater risk of developing some complications of diabetes and with high blood pressure. This can be helped with tablets called 'ACE Inhibitors'.

At your first visit your height is measured.
At every visit your weight and blood pressure are checked.

You will also be asked to bring along a urine sample that has been collected first thing in the morning. This is tested for: